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Post Info TOPIC: Mooky pet problems


Mookish Deity Most High

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Mooky pet problems


I wanted to ask a little pet related question and figured I would make a thread from it. Here goes.

As you may or may not know we(me and my parents) have a little (though he's not so little anymore) puppy called Zak. He's currently teething and this had resulted in him chewing his tail, his foot, our shoes and occasionally, us. Whenever he bites us we discipline him approrpiately, that's not really what I'm asking.

What I'm asking is, what can we do to make this phase easier for all of us? We have taken to hiding our shoes and providing chew toys but is there much else?



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Regular Crew

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I've found that playing with my pup Loki (who is also teething) and talking him for walks and runs helps to tire him out, which in turn makes him less nippy and inclined to steal shoes. Keep giving him chewtoys though, because that does work!

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Honoured Mook

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Have you tried the chew toys that you can put in the fridge (I can't remember what they're called, but we used dongs with treats in them).

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Mookish Deity Most High

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PandaPop wrote:

Have you tried the chew toys that you can put in the fridge (I can't remember what they're called, but we used dongs with treats in them).


I didn't know there were toys you could put in the fridge, I'll keep a lookout for them.

We did get him a toy you put treats in, but he's found that it's much more effective to roll the toy around with his paw than to chew it. Clever little bugger.



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Honoured Mook

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Redshoes wrote:
PandaPop wrote:

Have you tried the chew toys that you can put in the fridge (I can't remember what they're called, but we used dongs with treats in them).


I didn't know there were toys you could put in the fridge, I'll keep a lookout for them.

We did get him a toy you put treats in, but he's found that it's much more effective to roll the toy around with his paw than to chew it. Clever little bugger.


If he rolls it maybe try something "paste like"? (I think you can buy somespecialy made for dogs or maybe a bit of cream cheese)That way he'll have to lick and chew the toy to get at the treat.



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Mookish Deity Most High

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PandaPop wrote:

Have you tried the chew toys that you can put in the fridge (I can't remember what they're called, but we used dongs with treats in them).


now i've stopped giggling about cheesy dongs... http://www.kongcompany.com/

washable and tough enough to keep a pitbull happy, you can fill them with all sorts of things and as above pop them in the fridge or (freezer in the summer) before you give it to them as it will last longer. They make a bit of mess though, so don't give it to them on your best cream carpet. Clever dogs learn that if you throw them on the floor, more goodies are likely to fall out... mine like to throw them down the stairs no

the 'leave' command is probably one of the most usefull things you can teach your puppy:

''To commence training "leave" had a good supply of tasty treats on hand and be prepared to have fun with your pup. One of the easiest ways to teach leave, is to use leaving food as a beginning. Get a piece of food your pup has not eaten before, which is at the same time not likely to be greatly appealing - half a cracker for instance. Have your puppy on a flat collar and lead. Place the new treat on the ground, making sure your puppy notices you do this. When he approaches the treat say "Leave" in a gruff voice, and the second he looks away from the treat or even stops forward motion towards the treat (some pups may need to be restrained and physically turned away from the treat), go crazy with praise in a high happy voice and make sure he gets a few very yummy treats. Repeat this around 2 - 3 times in a row, about twice a day for a few days. Even the most obtuse puppy will be quick to realise that the reward for leaving is far better than what they were headed for.
Once your puppy is responding well to this, try using other things to leave. Scrunch up some old paper and drop on the ground, put a biro down, perhaps a shoe - you are only limited by your imagination. At all times be very consistent with the "leave" command and make sure that you always make a big fuss of your puppy when he does the right thing.

When you feel your pup has really got the hang of leaving things, progress to training him outside, again setting up a few things for him to leave. If he is successful at this, try getting him to leave something you just happen across when walking outside. Young puppies are attracted to lots of things so it will not be hard to find a moment to practice leaving it.

Your puppy should by now be very good at this 'trick'. You could now start to apply it in the day to day living with your dog. For instance, your puppy is approaching an electrical cord, so tell him 'leave' and remember to praise as well. It can be used if your pup looks like playing with an insect, or with a cane toad (for those of you in the tropics) etc. You will be surprised at just how useful this command is. And with proper fun, consistant training, your puppy will love 'leaving' it too.''






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Mookish Deity Most High

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Just try not to leave anything important/valuable around and get him some rawhide bones as they will last for ages and are good for his teeth. I found with Mina that there's very little you can do apart from be consistent with your training and wait it out- nowadays she won't even touch your shoes if you leave them lying about. It's frustrating now, I know, but a little trouble now saves a lot more in the future xx

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Mookish Deity Most High

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You can get a spray designed to deter puppies from chewing - it was a godsend when Lily was little! It's not so strongly scented as to bother humans, but for a dog it seems to do the job pretty well.

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Mookish Deity Most High

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this is good stuff, bitter apple spray.

http://www.vetuk.co.uk/veterinary-supplies-wound-care-products-c-141_169/bitter-apple-spray-p-1131

even stupid mabel doesn't like this and she happily eats tabasco sauce, haribo tangtastics and tiger balm.

you can also use this as an 'anti-lick'dressing on woulds you can't cover or on a pet that won't wear a 'lampshade' collar, so it's a good one to have in the doggy first aid kit.



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Mookish Deity Most High

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Thanks for the advice everybody! I like the look of this bitter apple spray as well.

Some good news regarding Zak, at least 3 of his teeth have come out over the week (I say at least 3 because they're the ones we managed to get off of him to save) and he's already good with the leave command, it's how I get him away from my shoes and washing so I can save them. Thankfully the only damage caused has been to a small wooden shelf we used to put the Xbox on and that can be easily replaced, he seems more intent on chewing his own foot and tail, which is why I like the look of the bitter apple spray.

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Mookish Deity Most High

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I thought i'd resurrect this thread rather than start a new one? and we can consolidate all our pet probz in one place??

anyway I don't have a pet yet, but there's two dogs i know pregnant right now so that means loads of puppies on the way that need a home and I have been yearning for a dog for so long. like i go to dog parks and watch dogs like a weirdo. i'm so broody for dogs it's ridiculous. i'm kind of still weighing up the pros and cons and trying to decide if i'm capable but will find it hard to resist if they're being born round the corner from me.

my main problem could be money for if anything goes wrong. so i'm looking at pet insurance. i have no income apart from busking and i squat and pretty much live for free. i've looked at comparethemarket.com expecting to cringe but actually even for me pet insurance is doable. but i don't know what the hell is the best cover? i've never insured anything before, i never deal with money stuff.

i think MoreThan pet insurance seems to have the most cover for the best prices. there's several options i'm looking at between 68 and 95 a year. it makes more sense to me to just pay a big chunk yearly from my life savings that i dont have any plans for than worry about it monthly. i also then have a whole year to save up this money (easy peasy) if i decide i dont want to dip into those savings any more. like if it's all done in one go i can chill out and concentrate on raising a good healthy dog.

i'm basically here for reassurance that I'm on the right track.

what are people's experience with insuring dogs? any pointers would be good!

are there any extra costs I could have forgotten about? feeding the dog will be fine, i plan on learning to cook home made dog food with the correct nutritional balance.

also i think both litters will be crossbreed which i think is better for their health. i know the mother of one litter-to-be is a bit of a problem dog, she can be aggressive and growls and snaps at people. i feel like i shouldn't get a puppy off her in case it inherits those traits? i mean she had a rough life before her current owner so it's not her fault but i think the effects of trauma can be passed down to the next generation sometimes.

if it turns out i'm not ready in time for these pups I'll be sad but there's always dogs in shelters who need a home.

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Mookish Deity Most High

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I have no idea about insurance or anything like that, but I do know a small bit about problem dogs. On a genetic level, I don't think it's possible for the traits of a dog to be passed down, but it is possible that after birth the puppies will learn aggressive behaviour from their mother.

I know that one of the dogs I used to own came from a very abusive background, and by the time my parents got him he was quite aggressive. However, I'm a firm believer that it's possible to alter the behaviour of all dogs, and through strict training my parents pretty much removed all traces of aggresion from my dog. By the time I was born, they had no issue with having him in the same room as me, and whilst I was never left alone with either of my dogs, I never saw any sort of aggression from them.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think you have a dog at your parent's house? So I'm assuming that you have some level of familiarity with training them, so a puppy with behavioural issues might be okay for you especially as the younger the dog the easier it should be to modify their behaviour. But on the other hand for your first dog maybe you'd prefer a less problematic one?

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Runic Mook of the North (mod)

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First off: dog, yay!

As for insurances, I obviously do not know anything about insurances where you live, but I suppose some questions are the same:
How much do you have to cover yourself of the vet's bill?
How much do you have to cover yourself if buying medication?
What is the roof of what they will pay for regarding vet's bills and medicine?
What exceptions are there to what the insurance will cover? (for example have I seen some insurances that doesn't cover the price of having the dog put to sleep and being cremated, or won't cover dental problems)
Do they raise the amount of what you have to cash out yourself as the dog gets older?

I believe that your main worry is going to be accidents, since you are getting a crossbreed and they are generally healthier. You probably do not need to be much concerned about various hereditary diseases, so I guess you do not need an insurance that covering a lot of that.

But while I'm talking about breeds, and I apologize if I'm stating the obvious here, I do think it matters what kind of breeds have gone into the mix. After all, they are bred for enhancing certain traits and while I totally agree with Inky that all behaviour can be modified there is no reason to make it difficult for yourself. For example are our current dogs well suited for my current lifestyle with lots of time spent out and abouts in the snow and cold. All dogs can be skiing buddies, but it is nice not to have to worry about fur tangled with snow, paws getting mangled by rough ice, dog bothered by the cold or exhausted easily and so on and so forth.

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Honoured Mook

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If it's a young dog you probably only need to get accident-only cover. But you will need to pay to have them immunized against all the nasty doggy illnesses (like parvo virus etc) which usually costs a pretty penny (between 60-100 I think) and is not covered under any insurance plan I know of.

Paying off insurance in one annual chunk almost always works out in your favour (a lot of insurers add interest for monthly payments, you have to faff with direct debits etc)

Tigas aunt just puts a bit of money aside every month as a "pet emergency fund" but as her dog is older now, and has a couple of minor long term conditions, they've cranked up his premiums obscenely, so it works out better for her to be prepared for something that might never happen, but with the money put aside if something does.



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Mookish Deity Most High

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I have absolutely no idea about insurance in the UK, but a pet is a huge financial responsibility. Vet bills for dogs and rabies shots etc rack up huge money. You squat. Is there anywhere for the dog to run around outside? Is there any guarantee you're not going to get booted from where you're squatting?



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Mookish Deity Most High

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Yeah I need a dog that will be cool with moving around with me a lot (also who won't feel the cold too easily and is easy to keep clean). I know of plenty of well cared for and healthy and happy squat dogs or dogs that live in vans and boats and go hitch hiking with their owners etc. I don't think the middle class family unit lifestyle is the only one that suits dogs. Dogs adapt and live in all sorts of environments with all sorts of people so it's not the moving around that worries me.

There won't always be a big yard but there is a big city with big parks to explore and we'll always be sniffing out new places together so I'm also not concerned about the dog being stuck inside or having no room to move. It won't ever be left alone, by definition squats always need at least one person in occupation so there's always someone home if I need to pop out without taking the dog.

I think I need to talk to dog owners who also live an alternative lifestyle or who aren't financially stable and ask what they do and what they recommend. I know people with housing benefits can get free vet treatment so a friend with that would be useful. I might have to wait until a time where I'm working regularly or on benefits but if not I'm willing to use all my life savings on caring for a dog to be honest. I'm also thinking I should wait so I can go travelling without a dog first and gain experience so I can take it with me in the future without any hiccups.

Having a dog one day is literally my only life goal, haha.

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Mookish Deity Most High

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If all goes well, and I get into university this year and we both have some money, we're going to get a dog! I am excite!

In the meantime, my poor baby favourite cat has turned up after a few days with more than half her nose missing. Yesterday it was literally dripping with blood, today it doesn't seem to be bleeding but it looks awful. She won't let anything touch it, but she doesn't appear to be in too great discomfort otherwise. Is this something I should take her to the vets for?

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Mookish Deity Most High

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Your poor poor cat! I'd definitely take her to the vets, that sounds horrible. :(

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