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Post Info TOPIC: What are you currently reading?


Mookish Deity Most High

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RE: What are you currently reading?


I've almost finished reading an as-yet-incomplete fanfiction based on my favourite game series. The thing is, it's almost 900k words long, which has meant that I've spent full days just trying to read a few chapters at a time. It's a cool piece though, full of action and existential crises and the like.

I'm also reading The Vampire Lestat by Anne Rice. Seductive is an understatement.

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Booky Mooky (mod)

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This week for uni:
Various poetry by Emily Bronte
The Ebb-Tide by Robert Louis Stevenson

For fun:
'Kingdom of Fife' in If You Liked School, You'll Love Work by Irvine Welsh

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Mookish Deity Most High

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Revival by Stephen King!

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Baby Mook

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I'm currently reading "A Game Of Thrones" that is the first book of George R. R. Martin's famous book series, A Song of Ice and Fire. This is really an amazing book and I started to read it after watching the wonderful TV Series. I have found book more awesome and interesting than the TV series so It can be rightly said, It is a must read.

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Barbara


Honoured Mook

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I'm midway through "The Voodoo Doll Spellbook" by Denise Alvarado and a YA novel called "Charlie, Presumed Death".

The Voodoo doll spellbook is better researched than I anticipated, and I think I'll be writing up a full review on it when I'm done. I currently have mixed feelings on Charlie, Presumed Dead.

The novel has a cool premise: at his funeral, two girls meet and discover they are both charlie's girlfriend. They realize how much Charlie has lied to each of them and decide to team up to see what else Charlie has lied about including, maybe, being dead.

It's a split narrative which isn't handling so well in the middle, but it started well and I'm curious to see where it goes.

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Seasoned Mookster

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Mastiff - 3rd book in the Beka Cooper trilogy by Tamara Pierce. They're really great for pretending I'm not currently where I am. There's so many Strong Female Characters and thick, luscious worldbuilding.

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Honoured Mook

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@Invisigoth I love Tamara Pierce! I actually got to meet her last year at Faeriecon. I'm a bit ashamed to admit I never read the Beka Cooper trilogy, though. I read her one about the lady knight and loved it.

I'm probably shooting the gun since I haven't even started it, but I'm about to start a book called "Egg and Spoon" which is based on Russian fairytales.

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Mookish Deity Most High

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Just finishing up Flow my Tears, the Policeman Said by Philip K. Dick. As usual, he's great, but it could stand some more explanation of the background elements (although I understand this is for immersion purposes).
Also, got a few nonfiction books about network attacks and globalization from the uni library, and I had a quick look through Rosa - Den Farliga Färgen by Fanny Ambjörnsson (= Pink = the Dangerous Colour. Really well-known feminist book about the colour pink from a gender, queer and class perspective) at the library too and ughh, can't believe I didn't get it, I've been thinking about the snippets I've read a lot. Have to go back!

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Honoured Mook

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Just easing into Rivers of London. Only have read a little bit so far but it seems fun! 



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Honoured Mook

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I picked up "A Court of Thorns & Roses" by Sarah J. Maas because it was sitting on my desk, I needed a book to read, and it sounded better than the book with the tag line "Will she find love this summer??"

So some pros:
--Cool opening scene: Heroine is in the woods, hunting a deer, when she realizes she is also hunting a massive wolf that is going after the deer. If she can kill both, she can feed her starving family. If she fails, she is S.O.L.

--Cool world building. The humans live on the otherside of an invisible wall that seperates their kingdom from the fairy lands (nothing neccesarily unique in itself) but her going into market and meeting a mercenary and talking about the fairy wars isn't too plot-dropping at all.

Cons:
--The fairies all wear masks that are magically glued to their faces. It's....sort of silly. I feel like she wanted a Beauty & the beast masquerade dance vibe, and I'm getting a lot of subtle Edgar Allan Poe allusions, but at the same time I'm like...ughhhhhhhhhh.

--She wants the character to have an IDENTIFYING TRAIT so it is CHARACTER LIKES TO PAINT which she just tells us a lot.

--It would have been way better in third person. The first person feels clunky.

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Honoured Mook

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I'm currently reading (and trying to apply concepts to my own life) "The Smart Girl's Guide to Getting what you want."

At it's core, the book is about empowering women to be more assertive. I'm about a third of the way through and there's actually a lot of things in here I recognize from my psychology courses. Speaking in broad, generalizing swoops, many women are afraid to ask for what they want, to say "no", or to respond in confrontational situations because they're afraid of rocking the boat.

The downside?

They package this book with movie quotes and plots from films I've never seen. They make a lot of jokes that I think are supposed to be "womanly" or something. It can get patronizing.

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Honoured Mook

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Currently reading "The Lifechanging magic of tidying up" by Marie Kondo.

This book kept flying off the library shelves. I didn't understand the appeal--it's another organizational trend, I thought. One woman who saw me reading it at checkout smiled and said, "The book is cute. It demands perfection, but it's cute."

I see the appeal. I'm almost finished and I haven't been reading it long. Rather than dealing with your items as possessions and asking you to discard them, the book asks you to deal with the memory/feeling about it and to keep only what you want. This appeals to the part of me that's studying psychology: we want to accumulate rather than discard. It's wired into us to store things. So by asking us to store things VS discarding, it's more effective.

What makes me nervous is this: she wants you to touch every item.

The more you touch something, the more you want to keep it. So it runs counter to me. still i'm interested in giving it a shot.

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High Mookish Shaman

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After reading cursed child I decided to reread all my potters

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so what if i love each feather an each spangle, why not try an see things from a different angle?



Seasoned Mookster

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short stories by carmenmariamachado.com/fiction/ - amazing magic realism with just a little bit of horror.



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Honoured Mook

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I'm about to start listening to Dracula on audiobook.

A friend of mine read it for the first time and thought it was going to be a ...uhh...more traditional classic. She had no idea how funny it was. her experience with it made me want to reread it, but since I spend about 16 hours in the car each week, I figured I might as well just listen to it. :)

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Booky Mooky (mod)

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^^^Dracula is amazing! It's funny and chilling in near equal measure - and though it's respected as a classic and taught in lit classes and everything, it's a bit crap as a book, like with Van Helsing's inconsistent accent. It is fun though.


On Charlie's recommendation I've just finished reading Call The Midwife, the memoirs of retired midwife Jennifer Worth. I love the TV adaptation of it and the book is wonderful, really warm and inviting. I wish it were longer!


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Honoured Mook

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Finally got round to reading Miss Peregrine's home for peculiar children. I'm only a few chapters in but I didn't expect it to be such a horror story! I've also been reading a lot of Czech fantasy.

What's everyone reading at the moment? I'm very open to recommendations and in the mood to branch out on what I read these days ;) 



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High Mookish Shaman

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I've been reading the fantastic beasts screenplay and gonna start end of watch (Stephen king, 3rd in trilogy) I'm really excited about it loved the previous instalments

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so what if i love each feather an each spangle, why not try an see things from a different angle?



Mookish Deity Most High

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I'm currently reading a book called Bain de sang (it means Blood Bath) from a Canadian author named Jean-Jacques Pelletier. Despite the title, it's not really violent. There are tons of references to what's happening right now (especially in politics). It's incredibly well written, it's complex, it's funny and the characters are interesting.



-- Edited by Wyno on Monday 16th of January 2017 05:06:48 AM

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Mookish Deity Most High

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La bête des Saints-Innocents because historical fiction is my jam.

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Mookish Deity Most High

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I'm several years late to this particular discussion, but can I just say that The Name of the Rose is a beautiful masterpiece of a book. Shame on the haters, it's up there in my top 5.

This week for university I'm reading an essay by Clement Greenberg, various articles and a book on Latin American history, and a silly short story in Spanish about a student who falls in love with her lecturer.

For fun, I've just finished The Art of Loving by Fromm, which was interesting in itself but also sparked a fantastic discussion of love and the nature of loving with a philosophy student, who then recommended I check out Rumi, so I've been reading a little of him. I did start re-reading Bluebeard's Egg by Margaret Atwood before term started, but my workload has picked up now so I've had to put it down.

Oh, and I finished an essay this morning on Nietzsche, so I suppose I was reading The Birth of Tragedy too.



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Mookish Deity Most High

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Mephistophelise wrote:

La bête des Saints-Innocents because historical fiction is my jam.


I was surprised to see another Mook reading a French book. Mephistophelise, you're full of surprises!



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Mookish Deity Most High

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Wyno wrote:
Mephistophelise wrote:

La bête des Saints-Innocents because historical fiction is my jam.


I was surprised to see another Mook reading a French book. Mephistophelise, you're full of surprises!


 I live in France and English books are crazy expensive, I don't have much choice haha.



-- Edited by Mephistophelise on Monday 23rd of January 2017 09:18:25 AM

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Honoured Mook

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Almost English by Charlotte Mendelson. It's... brilliant. Kind of offensive, too. Painfully mundane, and yet I haven't swallowed a book this fast in a long time. As a Central-European whose ancestors were, too, born someplace in the Austro-Hungarian Empire, I find myself pretty offended by some of the stereotypes perpetuated in the book. Angered, even. But it doesn't leave me indifferent, let alone bored. And that's sort of the point, right? 



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Annointed Queen of Mook - Founder and Editor

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^Ditto for family roots, and now I'm really intrigued. There are so many books out there that I'm not sure I need to read something with stereotypes, but your honest review definitely makes me want to find out more about the book and about Mendelson. Thanks for sharing!

The last really interesting book I read recently was Hot Milk by Deborah Levy. It's about a mother and daughter who head to a Spanish clinic to search for a cure for the mother's paralysis. It's written in such an amazing way that every sentence seems to matter, even when someone's putting a towel on. It's about family bonds and independence, and my mother felt it had echoes of our own relationship in it so I was very moved that she introduced it to me and lent it to me.

I'm currently reading The Outsider by Stephen King. Total brain fluff, but I fancied a summer read for the scorching weather. I'm only a third of the way through but enjoying it far more than his recent works - it's all done in top notch silky smooth conversational King style, and as his Twitter shows, he does live in the real world. His small town Americana is (no longer) all white people and "magical Negro" tropes any more. So far, he is bringing Black Lives Matter awareness into the novel in small but believable ways, from the point of view of people of colour. It doesn't appear to be part of the main plot, but it's there. I love that he does this, because his books are SO mainstream, read by fans who may pick up new perspectives from what they read. Isn't that why we read? To be entertained/informed and maybe pick up a new perspective?

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Mookish Deity Most High

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I'm reading La Catedral del Mar by Ildefonso Falcones, which is a historical fiction novel and a popular TV series over here. I'm only halfway through, but I'm finding it a little bit frustrating because the message of the book so far seems to be "hur hur all women are bad, even when they mean well". I like the story, but all of the female characters lack depth and behave inconsistently, and it's super obvious that the author is a man.

Everyone tells me that next I need to read The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett for comparison, which is apparently much better.

cowl does an edit: So I'm two thirds of the way through, and getting angrier and angrier the more I go on because it is BLINDINGLY OBVIOUS that the author DOES NOT KNOW WOMEN AT ALL. Like, maybe he spoke to a woman once and that's what he's basing all of his female characters on, but, seriously, they are written AWFULLY. They read like women of the male imagination, not real people.

I feel as though, from the concept, the book could make an excellent point about how awful life was, especially for women, in the fourtheenth century, but instead it seems to be saying, "life was awful for women, but most women are awful. anyway, here's a story about how terrible life was for this Mary Sue male character."

cowl's series of edits, including spoilers:

Spoiler

And I am angry at the author for thinking it is okay to treat women in this way, even though I know they're fictional.

-- Edited by cowl on Tuesday 31st of July 2018 10:33:26 AM



-- Edited by cowl on Tuesday 31st of July 2018 01:35:42 PM



-- Edited by cowl on Tuesday 31st of July 2018 01:37:24 PM

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Regular Crew

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Do you have a Goodreads account, cowl? I encourage everybody to review books they didn't like (even more than books they did like). It balances out the friends and aunties who give 5 stars to hateful nonsense.

Are you one of those people who has to read a book to the end even if you hate it? I am available to give anybody permission to put down a book they are not enjoying. I won't even charge for it. biggrin 




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Regular Crew

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I am reading Veiled Warriors: Allied Nurses of the First World War because I needed a break from sifting through self-published genre fiction. I'm committed to review Debriefing the Dead by Kerry Blaisdell, which I have my fingers crossed for.

After that, I may beast mode everything on my Kindle/Kobo accounts shorter than 40,000 words. I also have Justina Ireland's Dread Nation on my desk, which I have been hiding from because want to love it so much that I'm paralyzed by anxiety.

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Mookish Deity Most High

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Phew, I have posted a Goodreads review, and I have seen a few other people agreeing with me! I have also written a lengthy essay about why I don't like the book (but not a review, as such), which I will probably end up using next year for my dissertation on Spanish literature, haha.

I have a long holiday coming up, and a Kindle full of books, and none of them interest me. :(



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Regular Crew

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It's nice to find the people who agree with you. :)

You could check out the Amazon Kindle free ebook chart. Some of it will be competent, some of it will be stupid but fun, some of it will be worthless. It's a quick way to expand your options.



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