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Post Info TOPIC: Last book you read, and review


Annointed Queen of Mook - Founder and Editor

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RE: Last book you read, and review


The Circle - Dave Eggers

I really love fiction that has people trying to be people when they're being sucked into a business utopia that may be anything but. I loved Microserfs. Then I loved PopCo by my hero, Scarlett Thomas. Now I love The Circle. Powerful characters I can relate to whether I like it or not, and an engrossing fable about social media.

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Mookish Deity Most High

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Just finished Louise Cooper's eight-book "Indigo" saga ; I haven't been gripped by something so literally and metaphorically epic for a long time. I'll post a proper review later,but basically it's a little like the "Narnia" series only with an 18 rating due to a lot of detailed brutal fight scenes. The lead female character is also badass with a crossbow,but it's so much more than that...

[which reminds me,I can't wait for the next (and sadly last) Resident Evil film...]

Dave.

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Regular Crew

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Ubik by Philip K Dick

-Nice mix of serious drama and humour.
-Portrays a rather strange the vision of future fashion (eg. tweed togas).
-Very thought provoking thanks to it's philosophical/metaphysical subject matter
-A little too short for my taste but a great read nonetheless.

My second favourite of his works after 'A Scanner Darkly'.



-- Edited by oddball13 on Saturday 25th of January 2014 09:51:31 AM

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Mookish Deity Most High

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The Somnambulist by Essie Fox. It was okay, but not that memorable. I feel like I'm getting very fussy about books as of late, I'd rather enjoy them!

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Mookish Deity Most High

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I thought I'd posted this in another topic already ; found it now...

It's basically an eight-book riff on the "Pandora's Box" scenario set in a Renaissance-era pre-industrial revolution world,with a touch of added magic. Its take on that situation is to ask whether she can redeem herself and put the genies back in their bottles,but the whole thing turns out to be an allegory in the background of the lead character's personal journey of self-discovery. Sadly you have to wait for the 6th book for the zombie fight,but unlike a lot of characters in zombie films,Indigo knows a zombie when she sees one and the best way to kill it. And just when you think you know where it's going,the last book has a major twist!

It's one of the most awesome things I've ever read,and I don't read much these days but once I started it I just *had* to read it to the end,and it's been a long time since I had that need not to put a book down. It's epic stuff,up there with the "Narnia" series* [which I think I might read again,now] although far more adult than that is,due to the graphic violence therein. That's not a criticism-it's a necessary part of the storylines.

The basic premise is that a princess with a dangerous thirst for knowledge breaks an ancient taboo and sets loose evil demons upon her world,and after some brutal battle scenes which wipe out her family and [apparently] her boyfriend,it falls on her to make amends and kill them all,lest her world be doomed. To that end,she is made immortal and sets off on her quest to wander her world and slay the demons,having forfeited both her title and name,armed only with her trusty crossbow. The only hope she has is the knowledge that her boy is still alive,but trapped in hell,and that if she completes her mission,both he and her title could be returned to her. However long that takes. The exact nature of his hell turns out to be rather unexpected,though,as do the nature of the demons.

She's not alone though - keeping her company is a talking telepathic she-wolf who Indigo finds shortly after starting her quest and who turns out to be a loyal friend. However,she is not a cute little Disney wolf added for the kids,but the real thing with her own story to tell about losing everything she knew and having to go it alone.

It's just written so well,and you can almost literally feel as if you're in her world due to the descriptions,but it's also a gripping psychological story as well because it's *not* just a "bad-ass action girl with crossbow against the world" tale...it's as much about the mental journey she goes on as well as the physical,and that is written so evocatively as well that you feel as if you're there in her head,and boy does she go through the emotional and physical mill many many times. There is also quite a lot of interpretation and allegory involved,especially as it progresses,and the whole thing is just awesome.

I'd love for this to be filmed but I doubt it ever will because a lot of the story takes place mentally,which is rather hard to visualize. There would be only one band who could soundtrack something so awesome and epic though. Yep,Muse. [a not at all obvious choice from me,thought nobody...] The nearest thing I can think of in terms of epicness and world-building is Xena,but even that falls far short.

[*the BBC just repeated the two Narnia films made a few years ago,and will probably show the third next Sat. I hadn't seen them before but they were way more epic than I expected. And Queen Susan is a total BAMF with a longbow. In one 20 sec scene she shoots four dudes on horseback with four shots and then almost gets a fifth ; in another 15 sec scene she takes down another four foot soldiers without a pause,two with arrows and two by smashing her bow into their faces. Surprisingly,only a PG rating...]

Dave.

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Sounds pretty good, I'll add it to my list of things to read.

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Honoured Mook

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Just read The Cuckoo's Calling by Robert Galbrieth (who's actually J K Rowling ...) and it was pretty good. It's a mystery/crime sorta thing, and is really well paced with lots of tantalising clues etc. I was convinced I had it worked out a couple of chapters before the end and then I was still surprised. I wish I hadn't known it was J K Rowling though (damn person that leaked it!) cuz I feel it biased me in it's favour - nevertheless, it was good. 

My e-reader then suggested The Casual Vacancy, again by Rowling. Wow. It's FULL of triggery stuff (drug use, self harm, domestic violence, rape ... the list goes on ... shit gets real in this book ... I had to stop reading at points because it's all quite frankly and clearly described.) and the ending had me actually crying out loud, and shouting "no!" at my phone. It was so sad, but it's also an ace book, well written etc. Couldn't put it down. But not exactly a cheery read. I would give both an 8/10.



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Mookish Deity Most High

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A very sarcastic book called Fâché noir. It's from Stephane Dompierre, one of my favorite French writer. It's a collection of short texts about things that make him angry like people who don't have opinions, bucket lists, love songs, Facebook or hipsters. It's hilarious and so, so well written, I'm loving it!

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Honoured Mook

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OKAY SO
www.goodreads.com/book/show/17927395-a-court-of-mist-and-fury"> A court of Mist and Fury" is the sequel to " A Court of Thorns and Roses."

A court of thorns and roses kept switching between being really good to really 'meh.' It's one of those books that i feel would have been great in first person.

Plot is this:
Formerly wealthy babe is in the woods hunting to feed her starving family. Her father, who suffers from depression after losing his fortunes, is not supporting the family, and her two eldest sisters refuse. Heroine is like "I made a sacred vow to my mother to care for them, I do not break vows, even if they're making this sooo much harder."

So heroine finally kills a deer and a wolf.

BUT IT WAS SO ORDINARY WOLF.
IT WAS A FAERIE WOLF. OH MY.

The faerie wolf's hot friend comes to claim a life for a life, as declared by the treaty set forth HUNDREDS OF YEARS AGO, but of which this specific part she did not know. So the faerie is like "i will not kill you, but your life is mine."

Que heroine being taken to Fairyland by a hot faerie guy who is totally cursed to always wear masquerade masks.

Bla bla bla
some plots
she slowly falls in love with him
ventures under the mountain to face an evil queeen and save him and all of fairyland yay

So it was your pretty standard fairytale book.

But oh god
Oh god BOOK TWO


OH DEAR GOD
COMMENCE
A YOUNG WOMAN
CHOOSING HER OWN FATE
and making friends and forming relationships with men who want and view her as their equal
and basically everything I've been begging for in a fairy tale



-- Edited by Lokrais on Friday 24th of June 2016 06:06:37 PM

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Seasoned Mookster

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I read "Every Heart A Doorway" by Seanan McGuire a few days ago... It's.... something?
I had really enjoyed her book, Sparrow Hill Road, even if it needed more editing to go from "short stories she had written" to "novel", so I was looking forward to Every Heart.

The initial premise is promising: a boarding school for kids who have gone to fantasy lands or faery or wonderland or what have you and then came back to the Real World and are having difficulty adapting/dealing. The protagonist is the new girl at school, ofc, and right away we get a bit about how the school is mostly girls because boys are important and girls are supposed to be quiet and overlooked and that's why they go missing more often, whereas if a boy went missing, people would go and find him. This doesn't really make sense to me, because if a kid goes through a liminal space into another world, dregging the ponds in our world ain't gonna do shit, right? Secondly, only one of the girls, a Japanese girl, is specified as being non-white. The race/ethnicity of other characters isn't stated but based on descriptions, they're most likely white... which doesn't fit with previous statement because, black, Latin@, and Native kids are much, much more likely to go missing than white kids.

Then we learn that the protag is ace. Which is fine and good, except it keeps coming up in such a way that feels really shoehorned in. Plus, the protag has this pretty profound non-sexual relationship with the Lord and Lady of the Dead (the rulers of the world she went into), and it's very much not sexual but it's still... a 17 year old in an intense relationship with semi-immortal being. There's another girl who also has a deep relationship that either is abusive or borderline abusive with an older, more powerful vampire literally called The Master, from the world /she/ went into, and that ends up being a source of major conflict. So there definitely could have been space for the protagnoist to reflect on her asexuality, her romantic/physical desires, how she relates with her peers, how that informs her relationship with this Lord of the Dead dude etc. But that doesn't happen and instead we get like, a few cliché paragraphs about how she felt ostracized from her peers and her parents kept trying to set her up on dates and she didn't have sex in the Halls of the Dead either and then that's it. I felt cheated out of a nuanced ace character?

Finally, one of the characters is trans. And we know this because another character outs him to the protagonist right after they meet. He's also insulted at a few points in the text by other characters because he's trans, and the protagonist and supporting cast, to me, anyway, doesn't respond in a way that acknowledges how shitty and hurtful that is, especially as this character was estranged from his bio family and his fairyland because of his transness, and now people in his adopted home are being cruel to him, too.

So overall it felt like, McGuire sat down to specifically have a Diverse Book but didn't really... consider it enough. It's not a bad book, I would definitely recommend it to someone looking for a light read and/or ace representation, because, yeah, it is cool to see a main character who explicitly says "I am asexual". But I feel let down overall.

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Mookish Deity Most High

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I'm a bit late to this party, but Women Who Run with the Wolves by Clarissa Pinkola Estés. Hooooly shit. I finished it, and immediately started from the beginning again. It's just so... good? Really thought-provoking, really something to turn over and over in your mind. Really nice.



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Seasoned Mookster

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Horrorstor by Grady Hendrix. The premise is, there have been a series of vandelisms at a knock-off Ikea big box type store, so the store manager coerces two employees to stay overnight in an attempt to catch the perp before corporate gets involved and possibly shuts down the store or cuts jobs. Two other employees are also there, because they think the store is haunted and are trying to get footage for the pilot episode of their ghost hunting show. From there, things get scary. I'd rate it 3.5/5 for spooky (would have been a 4 but there's not quite enough sense of consistency in how the spooky works) and 2/5 for gore. There's a lot of great inter and intrapersonal development and the epilogue is SO GOOD. The epilogue made the whole thing work, which I wasn't at all expecting because horror stories so often just kind of fizzle out.

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Mookish Deity Most High

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The Midnight Bell by Patrick Hamilton. I don't think it's particularly well written - but I can't decide if that's part of the point of the book. The protagonist has aspirations of being a writer, so perhaps it's written the way it is to show his immaturity or lack of sophistication, given the implied perspective. Then again it's also autobiographical, so maybe Hamilton just wasn't a particularly sophisticated writer. Still going to read the sequels though.

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