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Post Info TOPIC: Last book you read, and review


Mookish Deity Most High

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RE: Last book you read, and review


I don't think I ever reviewed The Midwich Cuckoos by John Wyndham. It was quite good, but there was a massive build up and it only really got interesting about two thirds of the way in.

And I was reading the Nine Tailors by Dorothy L Sayers, and it was quite good, and then I suddenly got bored and I haven't bothered finishing the last half. I think I said on another thread that it was quite good once you got into it. I spoke too soon.

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Honoured Mook

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^Its tough to get through as the plot fizzles rather, but the ending's rather interesting! Promise!

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Mookish Deity Most High

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The End of Alice by A. M. Holmes. If you enjoyed Lolita this may interest you. It's very similar; the prose is deceptively similar but the heinious language and descriptions hit you like a hammer blow. Some people might find it triggering, others simply disgusting. Neverthless, I quite enjoyed it in a horrified kind of way.

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Regular Crew

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because i travel books are a bit few and far between so i tend to read what ever is available so i have recently read the fire series which was my brothers. it was all about dragons and it was good but it all got very convoluted towards the end but there is one more in the series that isn't out yet so i am hoping that that book will clear things up! but my sister also had a book that was for younger girls (shes only 8 and a young 8 at that) but the series was all about a Victorian orphan called Rose (also the name of the books) and when she becomes a maid at this magicians house she discovers she can also do magic and that's a very well written series that i thoroughly enjoyed reading! in the third book they go to Venice and it gets a bit creepy then. however if your looking for i more Gothic book then try White Crow by Marcus Sedgwick. its very good but absolutely terrifying! certain bits of it are so scary i almost wet my pants! its very good so that one i think older readers will prefer!

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Mookish Deity Most High

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I've just finished 1984 by George Orwell. It was utterly brilliant. I can tell already it's going to be a favourite.

But at the same time it frightens my because it's so plausible, so logical, such a hideous, yet all-too real, possibility. So many of us exist without questioning the word of the government or the state of the world around us. We swallow what we're fed and prey on others, hating who we are told to hate, accepting everything that we see. Subtly, our language, our culture, is being diluted and simplified into a bland and inoffensive pig swill. Popularity is everything. Liberty is taboo. I personally would not be surprised if our world was headed the way of Oceania, and am horrible afraid that only a small minority of the population would realise, or care enough, to rise against it.

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Honoured Mook

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Can i say "one of the last books" I read? A brilliant read was Catcher in the Rye. That book can change you. I've never felt such a bond with a character before in my life. A must-read. I think i fell in love with the protagonist.

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Honoured Mook

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Ok, i finished a novel in two days after losing my laptop charger (got a new one). It's called "Rape: A love story" By Joyce Carol Oates.
One of the most powerful stories every written, i've never wept into a novel as much as I did this one. She is to the point and quite forceful in her imagery. But very well-expressed.

Triggered anger and rage on behalf of the protagonist. A definite must read for all.



-- Edited by tybeany88 on Tuesday 17th of May 2011 01:09:14 AM

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Honoured Mook

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I finished The Behaviour of Moths by Poppy Adams this morning.

The book revolves around the reunion of two now-elderly sisters after almost 50 years of having had no contact with each other. The book is narrated by Ginny, a reclusive moth expert who has stayed put in the family home all her life, in the days following her younger sister Vivien's return to the house. Ginny recalls the times that she shared in the house, a rather delapidated mansion in Dorset, with her sister, her parents and her research.

The book wasn't exactly bad but it definitely didn't live up to expectations. The descriptions of the crumbling old mansion in the Dorset countryside were beautiful and I particularly enjoyed the parts where Ginny talks about her research alongside her lepidopterist father, but otherwise I found the plot quite bland even though it started off promising. Neither of the two main characters are particularly likeable, especially Vivien, but they are very realistic. The book is billed as a gothic tale with many a twist, however I managed guess the ending just three quarters of the way in and there are several points raised in the book that remain unresolved after the book ends which did get on my nerves a bit. Overall I wouldn't reccomend but it's alright, if a little bit depressing.

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Honoured Mook

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^^^ I also just finished Catcher in the Rye. Holden just kills me. He really does.

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Mookish Deity Most High

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Count to Ten by Karen Rose. She really does like her trashy Mills and Boon-esque sex scenes (or what I'd imagine to Mills and Boon-esque sex scenes, having never actually read any Mills and Boon novels [which is surprising given what my mind's like]) but I really liked it anyway. It's not the best written or most imaginative book, but it's still a good read.

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That summer-Andrew Greig

Its set during the months of the battle of Britain and I thought it was going to be a typical romance thing but it ended up having the best character development of any book I've read, quite amazing considering its just an average length novel.

It jumps between the shy,naive hurricane pilot,Len, point of view and his older,wiser girlfriend Stella whos in the WAAF watching radar. It was a bit disconcerting at the start as each chapter is narrated by either one of the characters and sometimes I didn't know who was speaking until halfway down the page.

It deals with Lens thoughts on the war, what the future will be like, whether Stella fins him too childish or below her station, his good but distant relationship with his family, the gut wrenching wait before battle against Germans he usually doesn't hate., how long he has left til its his turn to die.

Stellas story concerns whether or not shes too aloof and intellectual to forge proper relationships, her pessimism, her high-expectation mother and happy drunk father, how she feels about people who she would have never met if hadn't been for war, about why she thinks britain fights for a normality it can never have again,about how the other side feels, her imaginary 'Fraulein' who is a kind girlfriend of an anonymous luftwaffe airman who she imagines being kind and gentle but just on the enemy side.

It also has 2 other important supporrting characters in the farm of Tad, a Polish pilot and Stellas cheeky working class friend, who has a relaionship with Tad.

It was an amazing read, with lovely descriptions and insights into the minds of people during the war. It was quite a gem of a book.



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Mookish Deity Most High

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Eyes of the Dragon by Stephen King. It was a fairly easy going sort of adult fairytale; I quite enjoyed it. Also, it's a nice insight into the past of Randall Flag, one of his reoccurring villains.

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Lush Guru

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I just finished Game of Thrones, and honestly, it was flipping BRILLIANT. The chapters are all from a certain characters' point of view and the descriptions are insanely good, and just...ahh it's so good!!

It's about a place, and the houses therein with all their allegences and quarrels and the goings on and I won't say anymore lest anyone else want to read it (you should!).

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Honoured Mook

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^ I bought Game of Thrones last night in Asda as part of the 3 for a tenner offer. So many people I know seem to love it.

I finished this book a couple of days ago but I figured I might as well write a review of it anyway.

The Autumn Castle by Kim Wilkins

This is an easy-to-read but still very enjoyable urban fantasy novel.
The main character, Christine, briefly lived in Berlin as a child with her musician parents but moved back to America after May, Christine's best friend who lived next door, was kidnapped from her bedroom. At the age of eighteen Christine loses her parents in a car crash which also leaves her with permanent crippling back pain. Thirteen years later she is back in Berlin, living in an artist's community with her boyfriend, Jude. After blacking out in pain from her back injury one night she finds herself transported to the faery world of Ewigkreis, where her long-lost friend May (now known as Mayfridh) is the queen.
Mayfridh comes to visit Christine in the real world and falls in love with it, whilst Christine finds herself yearning for Ewigkreis. Unfortunately, the two worlds won't be aligned for very much longer and will eventually separate forever. Even less fortunately, the owner of the artist's community, Immanuel, is on the hunt for faery bones to create the ultimate sculpture.

I didn't do the plot much justice in my explaining of it but I really liked this book. It's not the kind of book that's really going to tax your brain and the plot was a bit predictable at points but even then it didn't spoil my enjoyment which is quite a feat and I found it to be a nice little bit of escapism. The characters were all very believeable with just the right balance of flaws and strengths, likeability and dislikability. The dialogue was also very natural-seeming and didn't once feel forced as it often does in some novels.
Overall yes, I'd definitely reccomend this book.



-- Edited by EverFrost on Wednesday 29th of June 2011 04:56:12 PM

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Mookish Deity Most High

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How to be a Woman by Caitlin Moran...hm...I don't know. It wasn't the hilarious piece of feminist literature the reviews all said it was. It was more of a biography, if I'm honest, with feminist commentary running through it and a few good funny bits. It wasn't really one of those books that held my attention - it's enjoyable enough while you're reading, but afterwards you don't give it a second thought.

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Lush Guru

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^^I read an extract from that in some newspaper or other and I thought it was really dull. Then I read a an interview with Caitlyn Moran and I thought her to be a bit dull as well, especially when she said there wasn't any fun feminism with humour and relevance out there - I just kind of thought "well you should get on Mooks or Tumblr then mate". THEN I read a review from Germaine Greer and she said that Moran wasn't bringing anything new to the table, but rather exactly the kind of "boring feminism" she hated, but just because Moran hadn't looked at enough variety in feminism.

Basically, I don't know if I'll read it, maybe if I can borrow it. I just think that she wanted to write a book, isn't well known enough for an autobiography and so threw in some feminism without looking around at what feminism has become.



-- Edited by Alka on Saturday 20th of August 2011 01:47:52 PM

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Mookish Deity Most High

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Harvest Home by Thomas Tron. It's very slow, but builds up to a stunning climax. The characters seem a little stock and twee throughout the book, but that's only so that the author can whip the rug out from under your feet when you least expect it.

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The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams

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Honoured Mook

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It wasn't long ago, but I read Sylvia Plath's novel the "The Bell Jar." I found it sort of shocking and very emotional and I felt a deep connection with it, even though the character was quite different to me I kind of felt like I understood what she was saying and going through to some sort of level. I think it was wonderfully written but for some reason I felt a bit dissapointed with the ending. I have to say i've never felt connected to a book like that ever...really.

At the moment I am trying hard to get trough "The Luxe" but honestly i'm finding it awful. I don't like the main character at all and I hate the location. I thought because it was set in the sort of times I like, that I might enjoy it but it's horrible.



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Tourniquet by Kim Lakin-Smith. It's a futuristic gothic noir thing, where Nottingham's rock scene evolves into Renegade City, a futuristic gothic haven for freaks, geeks and outsiders. In this seeming paradise, rock god Druid is led to unravel a mystery and find the worm coiling in Renegade City's murderous heart...

Although it's not the sort of thing I often read now it appealed to my late teenage gothic heart and the writing is excellent. She did a creative writing MA and had really famous authors as her mentors and the talent shows.



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Booky Mooky (mod)

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Dollface I felt exactly the same when I read The Bell Jar a few months ago, it's quite haunting how well one can connect with it, so much so that when I reread it while I was revising for my exams that I actually got scared that I would end up the same over the summer holidays... fortunately I didn't.

The latest book that I've finished was Atonement by Ian McEwan. I know I'm about 10 years late to start it, but it was absolutely brilliant! Like Game of Thrones, it's narrated from the perspective of three different characters: Briony, Cecelia, Robbie and for one chapter Briony and Cecelia's mum. It was so good to read how the sight of one thing can be really distorted from the actual situation by someone seeing it without knowing the context. Tonight I'm watching the film and lending the book to my sister so that we can read/watch and compare the differences.

Also, the author is one of the creative writing professors at my university so if I end up taking a creative writing module next year he might teach me. Eeeep!

One of the other books I'm making my way through is Samuel Beckett's complete dramatic works, which F got me as an end-of-exams present. I've read three so far, as it's being used as a filler between books and while I haven't read a lot of plays, it's certainly not like those that I have read. The dialogue tends to be very rambling and conversations between two or more speakers are short, quick and very repetitive.  I'm not sure if I like it or not.



-- Edited by Victoryxx on Sunday 21st of August 2011 09:58:32 AM

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Mookish Deity Most High

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^ Oh lord, I'm not a Beckett fan at all. Austerlitz is doing is PhD on him and absolutely adores him, so got me to read Mercier & Camier, and I couldn't stand it. Perhaps he's an acquired taste!

The last book I read was Extremely Loud And Incredibly Close, by Jonathan Safran Foer, which is about the aftermath of 9/11 as seen from a (very unusual) child's perspective. It's very well-written and cleverly done, and makes good use of visual cues and accompaniments to the narration, but, while I really liked it, it's so saccharine and tugs on the heartstrings so much that I got the sense of Safran Foer congratulating himself on being so mint the whole way through the book. Well worth a read, though.

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Mookish Deity Most High

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^^ Definitely ordering that now- I read Everything is Illuminated about a year and a half ago and once I got through the first chapter it was brilliant... I never even considered picking up any of his other books though. You're right- he is a bit of a smart arse. Alternately, as things worked well when Rachael and I did this, perhaps you could send it to me, and I'll send you some books back? Of course if you want to!

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Annointed Queen of Mook - Founder and Editor

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Both my friend John and I recently read Supergods by Grant Morrison. On the one hand, it's an absolutely fascinating love letter to the history of superheroes, with really witty, interesting and wise thoughts about why we love superheroes so much in the first place, and how they change through the decades to suit our mood.

On the other hand, it's an equally riveting account of his life before and after becoming a comics superguru who hangs out with MCR and gets interviewed by Rolling Stone. This part is really subjective, so his self-confessed subjectivity with regards to drugs, Alan Moore and his art may not be to everyone's taste.

But I thought it was a really brave book, 100% worth a read for anyone who loves comics. Oh, and I'm in there too, though only a little bit, and not mentioned by name.



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Mookish Deity Most High

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So I just finished 2 books. Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen and A Dirty Job by Christopher Moore.

Water for Elephants was really good but also kinda really depressing at the same time. It reminded me a LOT of my grandfather in the nursing home at some points in the book. It's a man's memoirs about working on a circus as a vet during the Prohibition in the United States.
If you like drama and romance, it's definitely for you.

A Dirty Job is upbeat, dark and delightful with a fucked up sense of humor. Basically it's a guy who's become a soul collector (Death Merchant) who has to deal with sewer harpies, bizarre little creatures, hellhounds and his 4 year old daughter that kills people by pointing at them and saying "Kitty."

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Mookish Deity Most High

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Harry Martinsson's Aniara.

It was the closest thing to science fiction my school library had.
Written more than half a century ago, it's about a spaceship of earthlings wanting to escape an radiation-damaged and war-filled Earth, but they end up missing their goal and are plunged out into deep space, seemingly lost forever (this is beautifully explained by means of a glass bowl, representing space, with a tiny air bubble in it, representing the ship.) The people then start to slowly adapt to their new life, but they also start cults, worship machinery, party, sing songs in accents from cities destroyed in nuclear wars and have lesbian orgies. It's written as an epic poem, with most paragraphs rhyming.

I was positively surprised, it is very deep and meaningful on many levels. I had expected it to be something along the lines of the working class-observations that he and his wife were more known for, but Aniara focuses on enviromental problems, war, and the effects of isolation and hopelessness on humans.

While some things, like the technology (it took me quite some time to figure out what a Mima truly was) could have been better explained, it was still a very engaging read.

And I had an impulse to write to the author and ask how to dance yurg, but then I remembered that he's dead. Damn, now I'll never know how to dance yurg.



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Honoured Mook

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The Scorpio Races by Maggie Stiefvater

Summary (stolen from goodreads.com)

It happens at the start of every November: the Scorpio Races. Riders attempt to keep hold of their water horses long enough to make it to the finish line. Some riders live. Others die.

At age nineteen, Sean Kendrick is the returning champion. He is a young man of few words, and if he has any fears, he keeps them buried deep, where no one else can see them.

Puck Connolly is different. She never meant to ride in the Scorpio Races. But fate hasnt given her much of a chance. So she enters the competition the first girl ever to do so. She is in no way prepared for what is going to happen.

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/10626594-the-scorpio-races

My Review:

Maggie Stiefvater makes horses scary.

This is The Black Stallion with fangs, a book that's ready to sink its teeth into your shoulder and drag you kicking and screaming through the pages.

Stiefvater's use of imagery leaves readers with a frantic drumbeat in their head and the insistent feeling that one should be checking for sand in their shoes. This book is dubbed a love story and rightly so, but the love readers will find here won't be in stolen kisses and awkward gropes on the beach. Instead, Stiefvater's words stir up a mixture of feelings that will have readers looking at the ocean in a whole new way.

This is not a book for cynical adults. For people who look around and hate the world, hate their job, and have too many obligations that a 404 page journey through Thisby is about as impossible as jumping on a plane and trying to find Thisby, put this book back.

Highly recommended to teen readers, fans of The Black Stallion, and "bad" faeries.

 

Other comments:

I didn't know that this is exactly what I needed to read until I read it. I made the mistake of saying to myself, "I'll read a few chapters before bed and then finish it in the morning."

I lost sleep over this book because I wanted to know what happens next.

"Don't read it," I told myself, "Just go to bed."

And I didn't read it, but that was still an extra hour I spent laying awake with the story running through my head.

Probably the best young-adult fiction book I've read this year.



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Mookish Deity Most High

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One of Jacqueline Wilson's new books, Lily Alone- I'll be horribly honest and say I didn't enjoy it that much as the child characters were so irritating (although I know that's what they'd really be like!) and I notice she nicks bits from her other books and rehashes them, such as the whole singing bears at the Flowerfields Centre routine and stealing food people have left at cafes. I know I shouldn't be picky, but still :P

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High Mookish Shaman

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I just finished The Forest people by Colin Turnball. Once I got over the use of the word "negro" at the beginning of the book (despite the fact he actually didn't mean it maliciously, it still pissed me off), I found it one of the most delightful books I have ever read. It was very moving, and I had that horrible empty feeling when I read the last page. Colin Turnball was an anthropologist who famously conducted fieldwork with the BaMbuti pygmies of the Ituri forest in the Congo.

The book has been criticised by the more scientific minded anthropologists as not having enough data, but it is an absolutely beautiful book. You can tell that Turnball cares passionately for the people and their culture, which is sadly fading as their forest home is eaten up by industrial change. In the book, we learn about the customs and mannerisms of the pygmies, about their initiations, their hunting, and their amusing relationship with the villagers outside of the forest. The pygmies are in love with the forest and live entirely off of it, unless you count the times they trade with the villagers for tobacco or palm wine.

I shall finish this quick gushing summary with my favourite quote of the text. To put it into context, Turnball had taken his friend and guide, Kenge to see the country outside of the forest and initially, Kenge thoroughly disliked it. He could not see why he could not hunt the animals in the national park, and found the lack of trees very unnerving. However, as he adjusted to it, he said;

"I was wrong, this is a good place, though I don't like it; it must be good, because there are so many aninmals. There is no noise of fighting. It is good because the sky is clear and the ground is clean. It is good because I feel good; I feel as though I and the whole world were sleeping and dreaming. Why do people always make so much noise? If only there were more trees..."

WOULD recommend.

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Baby Mook

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The mating by Nicky Charles  (FREE EBOOK!!!! AT BARNES AND NOBLES). ok so it is a very good werewolf book. I didn't thing I would like it based on the cover but after I read it I remembered why I shouldn't judge by the cover lol. It has some mystery/murder in it. and of course your typical love story....I love to read so I would give it five stars.



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