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Post Info TOPIC: Last book you read, and review


High Mookish Shaman

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RE: Last book you read, and review


I also recently finished book two of the Blackbird series by Freda Warrington (Blackbird in Silver; Blackbird in Darkness)

Story begins in a fiction world where three vastly different characters embark on a journey to slay 'the Worm' I have to say it is EPIC, if you enjoyed David Eddings' Belgariad and Malloreon, you will love this. Story is both light and bubbly at times, but mostly very dark, and sometimes a bit depressing, but excellently written, although the word puppet pops up a lot, i suppose Warrington (who is my FB friend :]) thought it was very descriptive.

Character development is the best I have ever seen.

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High Mookish Shaman

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I just finished The Many Lives and Secret Sorrows of Josephine B, first book in a series about Josephine Bonaparte.

It starts with her childhood in the Caribbean, her mother was a creole and her father a french sugar cane farmer/businessman. She is chosen to go to France and marry an Aristocrat who becomes Robespierre's right hand and one of the leaders of the Revolution.

The book leads you through the various stages of the Revolution and the turbulence on the other side, how the surviving aristocrats survived and adapted, and of course, the entrance of Napoleon Bonaparte, an awkward Corsican, into power. Very interesting and historically rich.

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Regular Crew

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I read Raw Shark Texts, and it was interesting. It was about a man who had lost his memory, and got letters from himself. And then there is a shark´s idea who eats his memories, wife who died and place where all lost postcards and letters go. 6/5

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High Mookish Shaman

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I finished Watership Down by Richard Adams.

To begin, I. Love. Rabbits. and this is quite a serious book, the rabbits take themselves seriously, and every now and then I'd picture rabbits growling at each other (they are very cute when they're all angry), and laugh.

It was a wonderfully gripping story, from about the middle of the put I could not put it down at all. I think I was up until about 2 in the morning reading it.

I'm sure most of you are familiar with the story, but for those who aren't, it's about rabbits who leave their warren because one of them prophecies that something bad was going to happen, and so they take off across the countryside. It's epic :)

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Honoured Mook

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The Very Hungry Catterpillar By Eric Carle (: single most awesome book ever to have been/will be written xD

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Honoured Mook

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Twilight Eyes by Dean Koontz

At the very beginning of the book it immediately jumped into the story-line capturing my interest right away.As I read,until about half-way through,I thought it was going to be the average gouls and goblins story(though I should have known better seeing as it was Dean Koontz)but then at about the middle,the plot took a wild and interesting twist.Totally original.The imagination that man has is beyond words.Deep characters.Detailed and well-described backrounds and scenery as though you could see it before your eyes.The book had me captivated until the very end.

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Mookish Deity Most High

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Push by Sapphire. Which I know was our Mook Book group read, but I shall post here anyway as I got it a bit late as my library had to order it from another town.

It was terribly sad. At first it was quite hard to read, and there's a lot of descriptions of horrible things that have happened in Precious' (the main character) life. The writing slowly gets better, though, because the story is really about how she makes a change to the life she otherwise would have had and gets an education. She starts as illiterate, and then goes to an alternative school, where she has a teacher who really inspires her to keep going with her education, despite being pregnant with her second child. I don't want to spoil it for anyone who hasn't read it yet and wants to, but some of the events in the book really put things into perspective for me. It sounds really cheesy, but I started to think "why was I worrying about PROM when there's people with much worse lives?" I loved the main character, you could tell that she had a really good head on her shoulders despite being around a family who had no values. The book was quick, I got through it in about two days I think!

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Mookish Deity Most High

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the carrie diaries :) the last line made it truely awesome

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Regular Crew

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Water for elephants by Sara Gruen

An awesome dark tale of life on a railway circus in 1930's America in the middle of the depression. I loved it, it has mad people, death, violence and sex, everything i look for in a book! It's a great story with many horriblely wonderful characters.

I can't wait for the film, even though they haven't died Robert Pattinson's hair ginger :(


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Regular Crew

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Last book i read is Acheron, by Sherrilyn Kenyon. It starts off with his history as a whore even though he was born a prince, then carries on with a present
day Acheron fallilng in love with Soteria, or Tory. I think its brilliant, but some of you might not. Its a good book for those who read the Dark Hunter series.
--Serifina

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Mookish Deity Most High

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Avian Trouble wrote:

The Very Hungry Catterpillar By Eric Carle (: single most awesome book ever to have been/will be written xD



I second that.

 



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Regular Crew

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umnn I'm reading 'The legend of the ice people' by Margit Sandemo. It was translated from swedish :P

It throws you right in, no messing about.
Winter 1581: a deadly plague outbreakrobs 16 year old Silje of all her family.
Homeless, starving and sherpherding two abandoned children.

Heading desperatly for the warmth of the mass funeral pyres blazing beyond the city gates, she encounters in the shadowy forest one of the infamous ice people, a fearsome, strangely captivating 'wold man'. He offers help - she feels irresistably frawn to him.

I'm a fussy reader and I love this book if you like witches, violence, etc you will love this story. I'm only on the 3rd book and theres about 7 i think.

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Memoirs of A Geisha- I couldn't put this book down and it was so sad, struggling but beautifully written. I was so surprised that a male writer could write the way it was written. The pains and yearnings that Chiyo/Sayuri went through was hard and you really wanted her to become a geisha  at times where that was  impossible  for her to do so with her debts.

The 1930s depression in Japan was not as bad as I have studied it in American Literature.

The world of geisha was a harsh but beautiful fantasy and the geisha are nothing like women I have seen in other literature. Especially the characterisation of Hatsumomo. Holy Moly Hatsumomo. If you have seen the film,  I would say although I liked Gong Li's portrayal of this scheming, hot headed and demanding geisha, it doesn't do any justice to what Hatsumomo is like in the book. Hatsumomo in the film was very sexual in her mannerisms even when she was horrible to Chiyo. It didn't across like that in the book. She came across as just a horrible and menacing character.

It goes the same for Mameha. Mameha in the book is more of a respected and almost legendary geisha figure in the book. But she can be seen as conniving too from a point of view.

The chapter in which Chiyo and the Chairman meet is just wonderful. Very sweet and kind that you fall in love with the chairman too. You feel like you can smell the scent of talc when Chiyo talks about the chairman and the napkin,which is like way of keepin sane from what is going on around her.

The sexual stuff in the book is grey and when you read those parts, it is like the feelings you get from licking an envelope (strange way to put it but it is true) so don't expect to be hot and heavy under the collar when reading it. Though you have to laugh at Mameha's description of sex. I'm going to tell you that!

The main focus of being a geisha is that of her appearance, her talents like dancing and music and entertaining in a social environment. And thats what being a geisha really should be about. You do get that and Chiyo sounds like very articulate for a girl who came from a fishing village.

I highly recommend this to everyone. it makes you want to understand the world of geisha more.One of my favourite reads
xx

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Mookish Deity Most High

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I read "The Island of Lost Girls" by Jennifer McMahon in about three days! It was excellent. The summary is that a girl is kidnapped by a man in a bunny costume, who has been following her and befriended her. The main character in the novel witnesses the kidnapping, and links it back to 1993, when her best friend went missing under equally mysterious circumstances. It's good!

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Runic Mook of the North (mod)

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Dark_Marionette wrote:

umnn I'm reading 'The legend of the ice people' by Margit Sandemo. It was translated from swedish :P

It throws you right in, no messing about.
Winter 1581: a deadly plague outbreakrobs 16 year old Silje of all her family.
Homeless, starving and sherpherding two abandoned children.

Heading desperatly for the warmth of the mass funeral pyres blazing beyond the city gates, she encounters in the shadowy forest one of the infamous ice people, a fearsome, strangely captivating 'wold man'. He offers help - she feels irresistably frawn to him.

I'm a fussy reader and I love this book if you like witches, violence, etc you will love this story. I'm only on the 3rd book and theres about 7 i think.



Actually there is 47 books..

Plus 2 other book series more or less related to this series.

 

 



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High Mookish Shaman

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The Sexual Adventures of Sherlock Holmes.

I managed to get a copy that was less that £40, no mean feat. It's the first edition paperback, written under a pseudonym, which I will add to my collection of Olympia Press erotica.

The author (Larry Townsend) was clearly a faithful reader of the Holmesian canon, as some pieces are copied in verbatim, with only minor changes to text. His own insertions and original writing are marvellous though, a strange mix of Victorian verbose detachment and brown-paper-wrapper emotive smut.

Also this is probably one of the best written piece of gay porn I have ever come across.

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Mookish Deity Most High

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The Catcher in the Rye.

What a dreadful excuse for a book.

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Mookish Deity Most High

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I've read...

.The Turn of The Screw
.The Woman in Black
.Needful Things
.The Shining
.Dracula's Guest and Other Stories
.Gerald's Game
.The House of Leaves

The House of Leaves was absolutely mindblowing.

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High Mookish Shaman

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The Many Lives and Secret Sorrows of Josephine B.
Tales of Passion, Tales of Woe
The Last Great Dance on Earth


The above are the titles of a three part series written by Sandra Gulland about Josephine Bonaparte.

It begins with her childhood in Martinico, takes you through her immersion into the life of a French Aristocrat during the reign of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette. She endures the Terror and the French Revolution.

A successful, self-conscious yet influental woman. This book is amazing, written in first-person journal style that makes you feel like a part of her life, a member in her circle of friends as they sit in a drawing room in paris, wearing wigs made of the hair of beheaded nobles and playing cards.

And then Napoleon comes into the story... read it for yourself, it's so worth it.


-- Edited by Arlenmia on Sunday 31st of October 2010 07:24:35 PM

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Seasoned Mookster

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i think i read "Witchcraft Today"

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High Mookish Shaman

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Possession by A. S. Byatt.

There were parts of this book where I was literally, literally breathless. That hasn't happened to me since I was about fifteen and first discovered really good poetry.

Byatt's immersion in her characters is absolute and believable; she ventriloquises Christabel LaMotte and Randolph Henry Ash with such virtuoso it is hard to believe the poems are not genuinely by Victorian writers. Her scape and scope are astonishing.

Her symbolism is quiet and subliminal, and the reason for this is partly given in her half-teasing, half-mocking treatment of modern academia and literary criticism. She is a bit cruel to the Lacanian feminists but very amusingly. I also note she taught at my university, I wonder if any of the attacks on academia are focused...?

It's thoroughly modern and yet reads like a Shakespearean comedy, or a script by a nineteenth century Romantic, or pure allegory. It was just wonderful.

And Roland Michell, the shy academic with the surprising soft black hair, sound like a fittie.

-- Edited by clockbox on Thursday 18th of November 2010 11:19:47 PM

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High Mookish Shaman

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Just finished American Psycho by Brett Easton Ellis.

I have officially found a piece of fiction I had genuine difficulty handling. Also the only book since Wetlands to make my physically gag, bringing my gag total to two books.

I can see that it is ingenious, and a clever piece of ventriloquism that takes ultra-consumerism, capitalist appropriations of psychical understandings of the self and body, and the pervasive pornographying (is this a word?) of Western culture to its extreme logical conclusion. I loved it for that. I loved the way he talked about porn, murder, clothes and menus in restaurants in the same monomanical, Eighties-fixation-on-purchasable-objects way. But I actually broke into a sweat and had to put the book down and wander around the library for a bit breathing deeply when I read the description of electrocuting a prostitute's breasts with jump leads until they started turning brown, popping veins, and eventually exploding and covering the walls with fatty tissues, leaving the ribs exposed underneath. I mean, what the actual fuckity fuck? And then I was like, "Oh look, I've reached my fictional extreme, this is the limit, it can't possibly get any worse." Twenty pages later, IT GOT WORSE.

The film is a god damned walk in the park - in fact I really enjoyed the film and found it very funny (the screenwriters said they wanted it to be seen almost as a period comedy of manners) which is why I decided to read the book. Fucking hell.

If anyone is interested in the pornographying (?word?) of Western culture, and the consumer-based, media-obsessed, technology-hungry logical extreme, but don't think they can handle American Psycho, may I recommend the sophisticated but amusingly named Super Sad True Love Story by Gary Shytengart. It's a dystopian novel, and I know there are a lot of fans of dystopian novels on the board. It also rather nicely discusses cultural contrasts between the East and the West, and the lives of first and second generation immigrants, although not in an obvious heavy way. It's a really wonderful book.

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Honoured Mook

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I realise these arent exactly novels, but Ijust love re-reading childrens books occasionally. You dont have to think about what you're reading, no plots, no big words, just easy to read fun books that make your imagination work overtime :)

So...has anyone read the Hairy Maclary from Donaldson's Dairy books?

I did an assembly with my reception placement class last week about Hairy Maclary's Rumpus at the Vet.

I love the names of the characters

And I also like the way it rhymes whilst not always using predictable words.

I think it doesnt matter whether you're 1 or 100 years old. Everyone should be able to enjoy the simplicity of childrens stories :)


On an adult note, Im reading a book called 'Heartsick' at the moment, im enjoying it so far, so I will be sure to share a review when im finished :)

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Honoured Mook

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'Memoirs of a Geisha' byArthur Golden. I loved it, although I found it hard to get into at the beginning, but I decided to stick with it. I think the truly amazing thing is that when I was towards the end of the book, I realised it was a man who had written it and quite frankly I was gobsmacked. The way he was so empethetical towards the main character was truly amazing, and I loved the style of his writing, even though it was admittidly a bit of an easy read. I would recommend it for a shorter, easier read. I finished it in about a day and a half. Really nice to learn about other cultures though:) I also just finished 'The Gift' by Cecilia Ahern, which was another really enjoyable read, of a completeley different genre. I loved the outlook it had on the world, and it was something fresh and different for me. Definite recommendation. :)

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Honoured Mook

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I just finished "The Book Thief" by Markus Zusak.

It had to be one of the most beautiful and tenderly written novels I've ever read. It was amazing. So soft and yet so brutal at the same time.
Death narrates the story and tells of his various encounters with a young girl during World war 2..I would definitely recommend it.

Also just finished "P.s I love you by Cecilia Ahern.

Dear lord I cried like a baby..Beautiful story. Thats all I have to say on that one.


-- Edited by Paddy_Kitten on Tuesday 22nd of March 2011 09:56:07 PM

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Regular Crew

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The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson.

There seems to be loads of hype about the Millenium Trilogy, so I was surprised not to find a review when I scanned through this topic! Basically, the hype is well-deserved, I thoroughly recommend you all go out and read this book! I only read it because I was given a copy for my birthday, but I'm so glad I didn't miss out on it!!

It's a bit slow at the beginning, but it does start the intrigue, which continues all the way through as you follow Mikael trying to solve a murder mystery and get the info he needs to bring down a corrupt business man. The mystery itself is great enough, but the characters are what makes the book. Lisbeth is fantastic, for those Mooks who can't stand Bella from Twilight, here is a woman you can respect. She kicks butt. There are also some truly horrible baddies!! There were a couple of points where I was completely horrified and disgusted, and some bits are still niggling today, when it has been a few weeks since I got through the nastiest part. I hope that won't have put anyone off though.

Please go out and read this - I want to hear your thoughts on it!! I've just ordered the other two in the trilogy, can't wait to sink my teeth into the next one!!!

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Mookish Deity Most High

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Room by Emma Donoghue. It's was amaaaazing. A bit depressing, but still amaaaazing and it has a happy ending. Kind of. Although sometimes I found it a little tricky to understand what Jack was saying because of how he talks. It's so good that it only took me two days to read, and that's around school, homework and hobbies.

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Honoured Mook

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Continuing my Young-Adult fiction binge.
I find it amusing that I enjoyed adult fiction during my early teens, and in my late-teens I'm reading young-adult fiction.


My Goodreads Review for What my Girlfriend Doesn't Know by Sonya Stones:

This isn't something I would normally pick up at the bookstore. Even with my new interest
in young-adult fiction, I tend to avoid anything with even the slightest connotation of being
a love story. However, I ended up enjoying this more than I thought. I wanted to give 3.5 stars,
however, but I rounded up.

PROS:
X Realistic version of being bullied.*

X Realistic duel-enrollment.**

X Story told in Verse; Flowed nicely, was easy to read both out loud and silently.

X Main character was easy to sympathize with.

X Didn't know this book was a sequel; it was easy to read as a stand-alone novel.

x Amusing.

CONS:

x At times, I would skip the 'title' of each page accidentally. This would lead to
confusion later on. Might just be me, but there was something about the arrangement
that made the title easy to miss.

x While humorous, the blurb about being afraid to read the book on the airplane sort
of through me off. It didn't fit the book, somehow. I almost put the book down, twice,
because of the blurb before buying it.

x The ending is rather abrupt to me. I reached the climax of the book, got to the end,
and sort of expected something.....more.

X The 'Tessa' story line felt like it was added in just for the sake of being added in.
It ended way to smoothly, perhaps leading to my earlier mention.

Overall, I would recommend this book to my friends. Turned out to be the perfect book to
keep in my purse to read before classes. The verse form and arrangement of the lines were
quite amusing and could bring a smile to my face.



http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/65066.What_My_Girlfriend_Doesn_t_Know

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High Mookish Shaman

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Lord of the Flies. To be honest, it wasn't as brilliant as everyone made it out to be. It was good, and I suppose 'groundbreaking' for it's time, but I suppose in this modern world nothing has it's shock value anymore.

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Mookish Deity Most High

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Porterhouse Blue by Tom Sharpe. It was good, very clever, but not as funny as Wilt.

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