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Post Info TOPIC: Doing a Masters?


High Mookish Shaman

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Doing a Masters?


Recently I've started playing with the idea of doing a masters degree. I've seen a few that look really interesting but as I've only just finished my first year of undergrad I have plenty of time to narrow my options down. My big issue is - paying for it. As I always wanted to do veterinary medicine I never really thought about saving for postgrad as that course is long enough thank you very much, but as I didn't get in to do that and am now doing a 3 year BSc in Zoology I think it might go somewhere to maybe making me more employable and it would be interesting to do but I have no idea where I'd get the money to pay for it. The one that has really caught my eye is £7500 just in tuition, let alone any further course expenses and living costs. Can any masters students past and present give me any advice except from get a job now and start saving, I'm trying to do this almost as I type.

Thanks. :)



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Booky Mooky (mod)

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I am going to keep an eye on this thread as I am in a similar boat - I just finished the second year of my degree and am considering doing an MA, but have no idea how to fund it (unless I beg and beg my parents). I'm also really stuck between courses and have no idea how to decide.

Someone please help us.

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Honoured Mook

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I didn't take a master's course, as it was too pricey for me in the end, but I did look into it, and I think I remember most of the advice I was given by my tutors.

Are you going to stay on at your current university? Lots of departments will have reduced costs for a master's student who did their bachelor's degree within the same department. It's also worth investigating if your department offer any sort of bursaries.
I was advised to go back to my old school too (high school or college) as a lot of educational institutions have a pot of money to help past students further their studies. These are rarely advertised, so most people don't even know this is an option. It's definitely worth calling them and asking. The worst is, they say no.

Ask your tutors for the best places to find funding. They are all sorts of weird and wonderful pots of money out there. I seem to remember one, for example, for the daughter's of army officers. Usually these bits of money aren't much, but even the odd £200 helps, right?

Get a good, high-interest savings account and put whatever you can afford in there and DO NOT TOUCH IT. Dig about to see if there's any money around you've forgotten, like old bank accounts you don't use. Did you have children's bonds or anything like that? I had just over £1000 sat in Children's Bonds I'd forgotten about, which was nice for paying off my overdraft! You can find out on the NS&I website.

Good luck!

 

EDIT: Also worth noting that lots of course are offered part-time, so you can work more hours alongside it and spread the cost and fund your living a bit more easily. It does take two years rather than one though. 



-- Edited by AcidKitty on Monday 17th of June 2013 03:03:54 PM

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High Mookish Shaman

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Do any of the masters you're looking at have a full time and part time option? With the research I've done, it is generally cheaper (by like, half the price) to do it part time rather than full time, which also gives you time to have a job and to relax a little!

I'll be watching this thread too though, there is a masters I have my eye on at Manchester University but I have no idea how to... well, anything.

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High Mookish Shaman

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Eccentrica Gallumbits wrote:

Do any of the masters you're looking at have a full time and part time option? With the research I've done, it is generally cheaper (by like, half the price) to do it part time rather than full time, which also gives you time to have a job and to relax a little!

I'll be watching this thread too though, there is a masters I have my eye on at Manchester University but I have no idea how to... well, anything.


 Really? Most of the courses I've seen charge you half the price for a part-time course, but each year. So if the cost of a one year full-time course is £6000, then a part-time course costs £3000 each year, adding up to the same price overall.

I thought about doing a masters in planning for a while, but my general feeling from looking at job specs is that employers don't really care about academic qualifications and are more interested in experience and other skills. I guess if being a vet is what you want to do though it'd be worth it.



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Booky Mooky (mod)

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^^^It's probably also worth noting that at most institutions, if you apply for a scholarship to partially cover your fees, it is usually only available if you plan to study full time.

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Mookish Deity Most High

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I'm not looking into a masters, but I'm going for grad entry medicine and that has its own funding struggles. Have you considered grad entry veterinary medicine? It's a short course, (4 years) and you would be entitled to at least a partial maintenance loan. Finding the cash for the bumper undergraduate-level tuition fees will be an issue, but as vet med leads to a professional qualification, I believe the government would subsidise your fees to give you a tuition fee rate of about £3000 a year to pay yourself (although there is a lot of confusion in this, and make sure to do a lot of research). It'd overall cost a similar amount or maybe slightly more, but it'd keep you in the field you are interested in- even if you don't get in at undergrad level, it is not too late.

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High Mookish Shaman

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Thanks Charlie, I might have a look into that. :)

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Booky Mooky (mod)

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Hello scholarly mooks!

I'm resurrecting this thread, as I am now partway through my applications to study Nineteenth-Century English Literature at five different institutions in the UK. I've filled out every bit of each form, including referees' details, and have one tiny hiccup with my personal statement.

I can't remember how to write a personal statement. I have no idea what these places want from me.
As I'll be applying for scholarships/funding as part of my application, it needs to be a damn good one and I'm really, really stuck about what to put!

I'm a good student who gets high marks and goes out of her way to do extra reading on top of working part time, being a committee member for a sports club and volunteering for a sexual health charity; and I have no idea how to 'sell myself' on an application form.

If anyone has any suggestions on what to include and how to get started, please throw them my way!

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Mookish Deity Most High

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I don't have any useful advice but I wanted to say that if I was the person in charge, I would accept you right away and give you all the scholarships. You're such a brilliant person and you always work so hard and give 100% in everything you do. I think your high marks, your volunteering, your implication in the sports club and the fact that you're working part time on top of that will speak for themselves. Being able to do all that and acing it all is the proof that you're an academic superwoman. I hope everything will turn the way you want to!

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Honoured Mook

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I despise writing personal statements, but from what I remember from doing mine;

 

I was advised to open with why I wanted to do the course,  then why I was suitable.  Follow with a few paragraphs about what you've studied/experienced so far and the skills etc it had imbued you with.  Close with a summary of how awesome you are.  

 

Hope this helps, but Wyno is right; you're totally brilliant and will ace it.



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