Mookychick Messageboard  
Members Login
Username 
 
Password 
    Remember Me  
Chatbox
Please log in to join the chat!
Post Info TOPIC: Neil Gaiman


Seasoned Mookster

Status: Offline
Posts: 80
Date:
Neil Gaiman


Having never read a neil gaiman novel, a friend recommended him to me and bought me American Gods which i have yet to read.

Are there any neil gaiman enthusiasts out there who would recommend their favourite N.G books and which ones in your opinion are the best?



__________________


Regular Crew

Status: Offline
Posts: 6
Date:

I read Stardust first (because of the film) and absolutly loved it. I'm now starting Fragile things. :)

__________________

http://lauraaaa.tumblr.com 



Mookface (mod)

Status: Offline
Posts: 2257
Date:

Ohhh YES, American Gods is SUPERB! Other than that, I'd really recommend Good Omens by him and Terry Pratchett, which is one of my all time favourite books and just bloody excellent really :)

__________________




Honoured Mook

Status: Offline
Posts: 139
Date:

I love Neil, but I'm very meh on American Gods; I think it's a retread of Sandman, to a very large degree, although of course Neil being sucky is better than 90% of the writers out there.

I like his short stories a lot. To get a good feel for whether you like his writing style without investing too much time, read Snow Glass Apples for the horror aspect and I Cthulhu for the humor.

Once you've finished these two, take a deep breath and read the comics series Sandman. It is very long, and it takes him till The Sound of Her Wings to really catch his stride, but the first book is important setup so don't skip it. I honestly can't describe how good Sandman is. It's probably the best comic book ever written. It is dark, tragic, hilarious, exciting and so, so heartbreakingly beautiful.

__________________

If the world is ending, we're throwing the party.

Try again. Fail again. Fail better.



International Mook of Mystery (mod)

Status: Offline
Posts: 957
Date:

Finally having time to read something other than textbooks, I just picked up American Gods at a used book sale to see if I'd like his writing itself (shamefully my only acquaintance with his work up to this point in my life that I know of had been watching Stardust and Coraline).

So far I'm loving it, and am sad that I have stuff to do tomorrow. Otherwise I'd pull an all-nighter to see how it ends.

__________________

"I like it when a flower or a little tuft of grass grows through a crack in the concrete. It's so effin' heroic."--George Carlin

 



Runic Mook of the North (mod)

Status: Offline
Posts: 2641
Date:

I like American Gods a lot because it explains mr. Gaiman's view on gods, a view that concurs with mine. Being raised in Scandinavia, surrounded by narratives from the åsatru, I'm always thoroughly baffled when encountering the american versions of old norse gods. I have, even in periods when I believe in my gods, about as much in common with an US Odinist as I do with wiccans.

I think American Gods differs quite a lot from Sandman at several points, but mainly in how divinity is presented. In Sandman, it is really the bird's perspective on such things while in American Gods one is very much given the view from earth.
Care to elaborate why you think they are similar ozymandias?


I do agree that his best work are to be found among his short stories though, and I think I've read almost everything he have published. Among the novels I prefer Stardust. I've written why it is my favourite book in this amazon review, so I just linked to that instead of writing about it here, lazy sod as I am :)




__________________

"So what you are saying is -I shouldn't play with fire" she said at last. "Of course you should" said One-Eye gently. "But don't be surprised if the fire play back." -Joanne Harris



Baby Mook

Status: Offline
Posts: 1
Date:

I love all of Neil Gaiman's writing (that i've read, anyway). I started with a couple of his novels, 'Neverwhere' and then 'American Gods' and I instantly fell in love with his writing style, humour and awesome imagination. Since then I have read a couple of his short story collections, 'Fragile Things' and 'Smoke and Mirrors'. I read the 'Sandman' comics recently........ bloody brilliant. Was completely obsessed, so sad there had to be an end, could have read them for the rest of my life.



Would definately recomend, but, sadly, not to everyones taste.



__________________


Honoured Mook

Status: Offline
Posts: 164
Date:

I must admit I find that the books he writes that are directed towards a younger audience are my favourites... *blush*. These would be 'Coraline' and 'The Graveyard Book'.

I love his adult fiction too (for that I would recommend 'Stardust' or 'Neverwhere') but his younger novels seem to me much more imaginative. The plot lines are more straightforward, not in an 'easier to read' sort of way but in a 'following the natural progression of the story' sort of way...

... goodness, Emmie could you have made that sentence any more long winded!?!
xx



__________________


Mookish Deity Most High

Status: Offline
Posts: 1306
Date:

I totally LOVED Coraline, it's the only book of his that I've read, it was so creepy!!!! I shall put a few of the other books recommended here on my christmas list!

__________________
[I am not afraid, I was born to do this]

Picklechops - splatterer of a thousand scrota! Don't mess with me! - Pickle according to Dave!



Honoured Mook

Status: Offline
Posts: 277
Date:

Coraline was great. SOME of the stories in Fragile Things were good, it was very hit and miss. It had some stories that I struggled to even finish, but at the same time, it also contained my favorite short story ever: The Others (you could read it through the link I've given, it's only about two pages long).

*edit* Oh yeah, I read Stardust too. It really was a memorable story, despite the fact that I had forgotten to mention it.

-- Edited by JuniperWoolf on Tuesday 16th of November 2010 06:47:39 AM

__________________

____________________

"All is not lost; the unconquerable will, and study of revenge,
Immortal hate, and courage never to submit or yield:
And what is else not to be overcome.
That glory never shall his wrath or might extort from me."

-Lucifer, Paradise Los
t



High Mookish Shaman

Status: Offline
Posts: 852
Date:

I couldn't read American Gods, just the first few chapters freaked me out so much, it was really similar to someone I know.

__________________

I'd choose freedom over safety because I'd rather die standing than live on my knees.



Honoured Mook

Status: Offline
Posts: 164
Date:

Mmm yes, short story collections are usually hit and miss. I think that's the same with all authors though...

__________________


Regular Crew

Status: Offline
Posts: 44
Date:

My favorites have to be Neverwhere (the surreal, almost Alice in wonderland, dark feel to the book sent shivers of joy down my spine) and of course Good Omens.

__________________
“Everything is poison, there is poison in everything. Only the dose makes a thing not a poison.” ~Paracelsus, father of Toxicology


International Mook of Mystery (mod)

Status: Offline
Posts: 957
Date:

Just finished Anansi Boys, and I'm pretty sure it has just become my favorite of his so far, followed closely by Good Omens, and then American Gods.

Did anyone happen to ever see the Neverwhere miniseries? I saw it on Netflix when I was aimlessly trying to figure out what I was in the mood to watch, and wondered if it was worth the time to view.

__________________

"I like it when a flower or a little tuft of grass grows through a crack in the concrete. It's so effin' heroic."--George Carlin

 



Annointed Queen of Mook - Founder and Editor

Status: Offline
Posts: 1965
Date:

Neverwhere is absolutely brilliant. Google a pic of the London Underground map before you watch it! Apparently Neil Gaiman is saddened by the low production costs of the series and would like to revisit it, but I think the low budget brought out the strange quixotic melting pot of an underground society mingling with the dirty things we ignore in city life really well.

Also, I like what they did with the angel's robe. They coated it with some reflective surface so it's brighter than white. In an old cavern filled with 1000 church candles, the effect was marvellous...

__________________

Hello from Mookychick's founder. www.mookychick.co.uk. @mookychick. Mookbook. Stuff. Writes things.

SPAM is destroyed. SPAMMERS are banned. Talk of truth and beauty instead.



Mookish Deity Most High

Status: Offline
Posts: 2919
Date:

Has anyone seem his books that look like they're aimed at really young kids but they're actually dark as fuck? My Mum owns "The Wolves in the Walls" and "The Dangerous Alphabet". Both great, but I wouldn't read them to anyone under 8!

__________________

Souljacker can't get my soul

Left my carcass with the worms and moles

Souljacker can't get my soul

He can hang my neck from the old flagpole

But the souljacker can't get my soul.

 

Silly Whore.



Regular Crew

Status: Offline
Posts: 28
Date:

I've read the whole Sandman series which I enjoyed. As an aspiring graphic novelist it was really cool to read his work. I've read many graphic novels and had never read anything like the Sandman series.

I've never read American Gods. I might look into that^_^

__________________


Mookish Deity Most High

Status: Offline
Posts: 1817
Date:

CORALINE!! amazing yet slightly creepy!

__________________

Florian xxx 

Dont you ever, Stop being dandy, showing me you're handsome. 

He/they pronouns pls



Mookish Deity Most High

Status: Offline
Posts: 1817
Date:

"Little Red" Ruby wrote:

Has anyone seem his books that look like they're aimed at really young kids but they're actually dark as fuck? My Mum owns "The Wolves in the Walls" and "The Dangerous Alphabet". Both great, but I wouldn't read them to anyone under 8!




my sisters got wolves in the walls :) she got it for christmas with the cd too :) shes 9 though



__________________

Florian xxx 

Dont you ever, Stop being dandy, showing me you're handsome. 

He/they pronouns pls



Baby Mook

Status: Offline
Posts: 2
Date:

The Graveyard book is incredible and I couldn't recommend it more! Good Omens is a wonderful blend of Terry Pratchett and Gaiman, so if you aren't in the mood for either one then it makes for a nice change. Currently reading American Gods and I'm pretty hooked - I have a long train journey ahead of so I'm saving it until then! I attempted Sandman but I guess I'm just not a graphic novel fan. Or I'm not smart enough to understand it...



__________________

"And the Hat filled with stars" ~ Terry Pratchett



Seasoned Mookster

Status: Offline
Posts: 75
Date:

The Graveyeard book was an amazing and heart warming story in a weird way. The whole story seems like something that happened in a dream. It is a short book but the flow is fast paced. When the pace slows it is either because something scary/has a big plot twist is going to happen.

Fragile Things was probably the eeriest of his stories I have read. I have the book of short stories titled 'Fragile Things', and that was very hit and miss. Some stories were gripping but a couple I havbe not read yet, despite owning the book for many years now.

I moved to London when I was 21, and a girl I met there was raving about Neverwhere. I thought nothing of it, but when she bought it for me as a birthfay present a couple of months later I fell in love with it. I was commuting to work but standing with my back to the wall as the book described there were creatures there. It was an eye opening and life changing book.

I have just started reading Sandman, and at first it was a lot of information to take in which put me off. However I have spent the whole day reading and napping (I'm 26 and have a onesie, shoot me). I am about half way through the first book of supposedly 9 and I am loving it! I think that whoever thinks it is like American Gods is either deluded or read Sandman first. It is nothing like it. Sandman has a darker theme, whereas American Gods has a character with a dark story (shadow). American Gods has a mythological vibe to it with a modern twist, whereas Sandman it based on 7 main characters that are based on ideas. What is interesting is that the characters in Sandman can change, the characters in American Gods don't.


I am reading 'The Ocean at the End of the Lane', has anybody read that?

Also Neverwhere is on BBC radio 2 over christmas I would check it out: www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01r522y/episodes/guide

__________________

 To have more will than fear is to be a super hero.



Runic Mook of the North (mod)

Status: Offline
Posts: 2641
Date:

ooh, I've never actually heard Neverwhere, only read the book. By the way, for some reason I find it logical to read Newerwhere at the same time as China Miéville's Kraken?

I find I disagree with what you say about Sandman and American Gods being very different, and would love to discuss it but then I'd spoiler Sandman for you seeing that you haven't finished it...



__________________

"So what you are saying is -I shouldn't play with fire" she said at last. "Of course you should" said One-Eye gently. "But don't be surprised if the fire play back." -Joanne Harris



Mookish Deity Most High

Status: Offline
Posts: 1817
Date:

I still haven't listened to Neverwhere I've been meaning to for ages. I've read the book and watched the tv series and I thoroughly enjoyed both.
I started reading The Sandman series last year and I adore it. I haven't read it all yet as I'm relying on finding the correct copies in my Dads collection or borrowing them form the library. I have realised I've basically been turning into Desire! I can't wait to read more.
I last year I read Neverwhere, Anansi Boys and The graveyard book I'm sure I read another, but I can't remember what. Hmmm.
It was really great, in June me, Glitterphobe and Mandolin (his other partner) went to see him give a talk and he read a bit of Ocean at the end of the lain, I also got the book then and got it signed and things. I haven't read it yet though. I might try and finish the other books I have on the go and start it soon.
I really want to read everything by him, I love his writing so much.

__________________

Florian xxx 

Dont you ever, Stop being dandy, showing me you're handsome. 

He/they pronouns pls



Regular Crew

Status: Offline
Posts: 9
Date:

Ive yet to find a writer as good as Neil Gaiman, I absolutely love his work. I started with The Sandman, sadly I haven't been able to afford the whole series just yet but it's on my little wish list. I don't have a favourite as yet because all so good but at the moment I've been enjoying my favourite short stories from Fragile Things. I've just picked up Black Orchid so excited to read that. My fiancé checked out his comic collection and found a few Spawn issues Neil had written so those will be next on my list to read. He has recently brought out a new collection of short stories so excited about reading that one also the graphic novel adaption of The Graveyard book that I got for Christmas.

__________________
“To be nobody but yourself in a world which is doing its best day and night to make you like everybody else means to fight the hardest battle which any human being can fight and never stop fighting.” ― E.E. Cumming


Honoured Mook

Status: Offline
Posts: 208
Date:

I honestly don't know what my first Neil Gaiman book was.

I think it might have been one of the spin-off comics about Death from Sandman, or it might have been Good Omens. I know I read Anansi boys before American Gods, so that was a little confusing to me at first, but it was still enjoyable.

Good Omens, the Graveyard Book, American Gods & Anansi Boys are all up there.

If I can make a bold suggestion: if you are able to access it, listen to Stardust on Audiobook. There's something about hearing a fairy-tale-for-adults read aloud like a traditional fairytale that just makes it so much intimate. (Bonus points: it's narrated by Gaiman himself)




I'm ashamed to say I've never read Neverwhere, but I'm going to have to now after seeing all the positive recommendations.



What was the first Neil Gaiman book you read? Did that affect your decision to read the others?

__________________
Die, v.: To stop sinning suddenly. -Elbert Hubbard


Annointed Queen of Mook - Founder and Editor

Status: Offline
Posts: 1965
Date:

I'm quite enjoying these necroposts! The first novel I think I read was American Gods, and couldn't quite see the point after Sandman, except for wanting to reach a broader audience. So the first thing I read was Sandman, and that was so ground-breaking at the time that I resolved to read whatever else he did. I love his short stories best - with the best of them, and the poems too, I'm fully immersed. There are some visual ideas I'll never forget, like all the ones in The Day the Saucers Came. Which books I loved best? The Graveyard Book, and Nevewhere, and Anansi Boys.

I remember also how he once told Lenny Henry that he would never write Neverwhere as a book about homeless people, because he feared he would make the state of homelessness too appealing. That was really interesting to me. With great power...



__________________

Hello from Mookychick's founder. www.mookychick.co.uk. @mookychick. Mookbook. Stuff. Writes things.



Honoured Mook

Status: Offline
Posts: 208
Date:

Hahah well, I was going to make a new thread at first, but it seemed silly when there was a Neil Gaiman thread already in existence only a few threads down.

I've never seen The Day the Saucers Came so this is a first for me! I've somehow neglected a lot of his short stories, which is a shame because I usually like to read short stories by favorite authors to see what they can get away with that they can't in novels. I don't mean that in a bad way, just more of the "this would never work for 400 pages, but it works great in 14" kid of ideas.

I just read that and oh my god it was wonderful haha.

I think my favorite short piece by him is probably Instructions. I read it in a compilation of short stories called "Wolves at the Door".



__________________
Die, v.: To stop sinning suddenly. -Elbert Hubbard
Page 1 of 1  sorted by
 
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.

Tweet this page Post to Digg Post to Del.icio.us